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  1. #1
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Home Improvement

    Hope i didn't miss the thread somewhere. It was a good albeit slow one on Foh.

    I got reminded because i just showered in a bathroom i've been redoing for the last 2 months or so. Probably cost me about 2000. The best thing is i'm really started to feel comfortable with a lot of this stuff now so i don't put it off like i did in the first one.

    The most amazing thing in this project was the I kept the original (cast iron) tub and how clean it came. It had 50 years of rust-mold-caulk-glue-fucking-weatherstripping-the-idiots-before-me-put-on-there and after i took that off with a razorblade and scrubbed it looks fine.

    20121123_121125.jpg20121123_121234.jpg20121123_123856.jpg20130120_194716.jpg20130120_194729.jpg20130120_194745.jpg

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    How much total time did that take you? Did you have any remodeling/construction experience beforehand?

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    Retired RR Pantheon Mod Convo's Avatar
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    Nice job on the bathroom man.
    Do any of you guys have basement waterproofing experience? I'm considering doing it myself to save some money but not sure how risky it is. It doesn't seem too hard...

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    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Suave View Post
    How much total time did that take you? Did you have any remodeling/construction experience beforehand?
    Very rough estimate of 50+ hours. I did another smaller although much more fucked up bathroom in the same house and it took me about 9 months but i definitely took my time -- so moderate experience but i did learn a lot from the first bathroom.

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    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Convo View Post
    Nice job on the bathroom man.
    Do any of you guys have basement waterproofing experience? I'm considering doing it myself to save some money but not sure how risky it is. It doesn't seem too hard...
    Painting shit with drylok is obviously pretty easy.

    I would definitely call people and get estimates and opinions on what needs to be done though. If you have access around your house and easy digging trenching to the footer and installing underdrains and waterproofing might not be unreasonable. And is in my opinion is hands down the best solution. With that bdry gutter shit you still have a lot of water pushing on your foundation wall which they say is the #1 reason for retaining wall failure.

    My experience with DIY waterproofing is that it never works.

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    Survived 9/23/2015 Soygen's Avatar
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    Looks good, P. I have to redo both of my bathrooms. Come south.

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    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Great job on the bathroom, nice choices!

    Quote Originally Posted by Convo View Post
    Nice job on the bathroom man.
    Do any of you guys have basement waterproofing experience? I'm considering doing it myself to save some money but not sure how risky it is. It doesn't seem too hard...
    I do. It's really time consuming to do yourself correctly, but it isn't rocket science. If you have time, and the ability/willingness to dig, you can do it.

    Dig down to near the bottom of your foundation, all the way around. Doesn't have to be much, just enough to get yourself down there. Get the foundation tar/waterproofing compound, put it on. Put o-pipe with silt screen around, and direct it to a french well about 20 feet away from your house. Add 2-3 feet of coarse gravel, back fill. Paint the inside with drylock. You'll never have any moisture problems again.

    Five years ago I bought a repossessed house in a great neighbourhood. It had been a crack house, and they had cooked meth in it. I've gone to the studs in every room, and I"m nearly done. Entirely new house, and very much of my own design. I had to move most walls on the main floor, and I think I've ingested roughly 20 pounds of drywall dust, but it's coming to completion now.

    Thumbs up to those who do their own work!

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    "AH HA HA HA HA HA" Barraco Bisi's Avatar
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    2013-01-21 19.18.08.jpg

    Here's a project that I'll be starting in the next 12 months.

    I have a fairly small house, so we try to use every possible space as effectively as possible. You'll see the picture above of a landing between the main floor and the basement, just a few steps down from the kitchen area. What I'd like to do is build a pantry on that ledge where the pictures are currently sitting. The challenge is whatever cabinets I install there will have to be removable, since that foot of space is needed when you move things like couches down to the basement.

    Any tips for installing cabinets? Can you buy cabinet kits?

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    Registered User November's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lurkingdirk View Post
    Great job on the bathroom, nice choices!



    I do. It's really time consuming to do yourself correctly, but it isn't rocket science. If you have time, and the ability/willingness to dig, you can do it.

    Dig down to near the bottom of your foundation, all the way around. Doesn't have to be much, just enough to get yourself down there. Get the foundation tar/waterproofing compound, put it on. Put o-pipe with silt screen around, and direct it to a french well about 20 feet away from your house. Add 2-3 feet of coarse gravel, back fill. Paint the inside with drylock. You'll never have any moisture problems again.

    Five years ago I bought a repossessed house in a great neighbourhood. It had been a crack house, and they had cooked meth in it. I've gone to the studs in every room, and I"m nearly done. Entirely new house, and very much of my own design. I had to move most walls on the main floor, and I think I've ingested roughly 20 pounds of drywall dust, but it's coming to completion now.

    Thumbs up to those who do their own work!
    Since you have some experience with basements, I have a few questions for you:

    1.) My house was built in 2010 with a French drain system. The basement is currently unfinished. Last spring we had about nine inches of rain over a day or so. Most of the foundation wall was dry except the very bottom where I assume the drain tile runs adjacent. The entire perimeter of the basement had visible moisture at this level, and in one corner I had actually had water puddling on the floor. I assumed the whole system got inundated with that amount of water and it needed somewhere to go. That one corner where the water came in was a drip point where half of the main roof dumped onto the garage roof and poured over to the ground. The French drain system was working as I heard the sump pump working on and off for at least three days, and I could hear the constant trickle of water into the pump's reservoir. Another curiosity was the water seemed to have seeped up from the slab only where the builders had pre-installed the drain pipes for the 2nd bathroom in the basement for when it gets finished - the water was only visible from an inch or two radius from these drains. I wasn't sure what to make of it as I though the drain system would handle this but obviously it didn't.

    I have since installed gutters that summer which I hope alleviates most of the water issues, and I will adjust the grade on the sides to make sure I have no future moisture problems.

    2.) I assume the pink foam board insulation is the way to go against the foundation wall for when we start to finish the basement. I have a neighbor that has the same floorplan as my house, and he finished his basement this past fall. I saw he installed studs against the foundation wall and put fiberglass batting directly against the foundation. I told him about the foam board but he just shrugged. If he has any moisture in the foundation, that batting is just going to soak it up and present mold issues, correct?

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    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by November View Post
    Since you have some experience with basements, I have a few questions for you:

    1.) My house was built in 2010 with a French drain system. The basement is currently unfinished. Last spring we had about nine inches of rain over a day or so. Most of the foundation wall was dry except the very bottom where I assume the drain tile runs adjacent. The entire perimeter of the basement had visible moisture at this level, and in one corner I had actually had water puddling on the floor. I assumed the whole system got inundated with that amount of water and it needed somewhere to go. That one corner where the water came in was a drip point where half of the main roof dumped onto the garage roof and poured over to the ground. The French drain system was working as I heard the sump pump working on and off for at least three days, and I could hear the constant trickle of water into the pump's reservoir. Another curiosity was the water seemed to have seeped up from the slab only where the builders had pre-installed the drain pipes for the 2nd bathroom in the basement for when it gets finished - the water was only visible from an inch or two radius from these drains. I wasn't sure what to make of it as I though the drain system would handle this but obviously it didn't.

    I have since installed gutters that summer which I hope alleviates most of the water issues, and I will adjust the grade on the sides to make sure I have no future moisture problems.
    Sounds to me like you have a pretty good clue about basements, too. I would say that you're bang on about the whole system getting inundated with water. If the entire perimeter of the basement had the same height of wetness, that's not nature. That's your water exit system being overloaded. I would say that installing gutters and improving your grade would prevent this from happening again. The alternative is to replace the french drain tiles, making them a foot lower. Also, if this only happens when you get nine inches of rain in a day, it is certainly not going to happen very often.

    It also sounds like you have some water under your slab. This isn't the end of the world, and if the only place you're seeing seepage is around your drain pipes, I wouldn't worry about it. It's most likely that you had some air trappage around those pipes when then cement was poured, and it's just a bit thinner there. If ever you put a bathroom there, your shower will more than cover the affected area, as will your toilet and vanity. Be sure to have an extra large wax seal on the toilet, and don't tile under your vanity, and there will be no problems.

    2.) I assume the pink foam board insulation is the way to go against the foundation wall for when we start to finish the basement. I have a neighbor that has the same floorplan as my house, and he finished his basement this past fall. I saw he installed studs against the foundation wall and put fiberglass batting directly against the foundation. I told him about the foam board but he just shrugged. If he has any moisture in the foundation, that batting is just going to soak it up and present mold issues, correct?
    The very best thing you can do for basement insulation is this:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...=j61rDDNKAk0#!

    http://www.sprayfoamdirect.com/

    However, that's not available everywhere (not where I live, for example). Other than that, yes, I'd say the foam board insulation is the best way to go. I'm helping a friend with this currently, as a matter of fact. What we're doing is gluing the foam board to the cement, and putting 2x2 strapping on top of it (attaching through the wood and foam to the cement with countersunk tap-con screws). The 2x2 strapping makes it easy to attach drywall, and it makes it very easy to legally run all electrical. Keep in mind that it is not only okay, but advisable to leave a 2 inch gap between the basement floor and the start of your insulation. This prevents anything you put in there from getting damp if the floor gets wet, and you really don't have to insulate at the very bottom of your basement. The ground doesn't get cold that deep.
    It is entirely possible to use batting and prevent mold issues, but it is a lot harder to get right, and a lot easier to get mold.

    Sorry, I'm not usually so long winded. PM me if you need anything else. I don't want to clog the thread.

  11. #11
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    If the wall is buried do you really need insulation? I like keeping it two inches off the ground. Maybe do that with drywall to a lesser degree and the baseboard will cover it

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    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picasso View Post
    If the wall is buried do you really need insulation? I like keeping it two inches off the ground. Maybe do that with drywall to a lesser degree and the baseboard will cover it
    Yup. I said the same in the above post. Most basement walls do need insulation, though the average only need it starting about 2 feet off the floor. Insulating to 2 inches above the floor doesn't add much cost, it prevents the floor-water issue, gives everyone peace of mind, and makes for a toasty basement.

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    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Big A I'd do it with furniture. Homegoods, lowes etc usually have some small cabinets. Maybe use kitchen wall cabinets. Not sure, all I know is me building some shit that would meet a woman's approval in what looks like a well built house, wouldn't happen.

  14. #14
    crushin' them guts Warrian's Avatar
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    Bathroom looks good. Is it the angle of the picture or is the bathroom mirror not lined up with the sink?

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    "AH HA HA HA HA HA" Barraco Bisi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picasso View Post
    Big A I'd do it with furniture. Homegoods, lowes etc usually have some small cabinets. Maybe use kitchen wall cabinets. Not sure, all I know is me building some shit that would meet a woman's approval in what looks like a well built house, wouldn't happen.
    That's what I'm thinking. I wonder if I could find someone selling old cabinets that they are replacing.

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    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    You could. Looks like you have white trim though so you could find new white cabinets probably pretty cheap and sleep in the creek

  17. #17
    "AH HA HA HA HA HA" Barraco Bisi's Avatar
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    I bet I could ikeahack too

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    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    20130122_181117.jpg

    The mirror is a 48" medicine cabinet surface mounted, it's probably an interior design "fuck no" but it was too easy and too functional. The previous cabinet was old and too small and i was too lazy to bust open the wall, reroute vent pipes, put in header, etc for a larger recessed. I'm stoked about how much shit i can put in it, i haven't even used my vanity for storage yet. I still need to adjust the door alignment but I can put that off for 6 or 8 months.

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    Registered User Springbok's Avatar
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    Sharp bathroom. You give any thought to molding above the tile? Plain white would look good - my folks did something eerily similar last summer with my help, and the molding really tied it together well. Cheap and easy to install.

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    Registered User kegkilla's Avatar
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    your parents have shit taste in decorating, gtfo
    CAUTION: THIS BOARD IS MODERATED BY ISIS SYMPATHIZERS
    Quote Originally Posted by chaos View Post
    No one is any worse than anyone else, we're all just pushing our own agendas. Even ISIS

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    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    I have a schluter profile on all of the tile edge except the edges beside the medicine cabinet. It's sharp stuff and affordable. I discovered it about halfway through the project and home Depot. Lowes has it too now.

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    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grand Inquisitor Kegkilla View Post
    your parents have shit taste in decorating, gtfo
    I mean this as a sincere question: Are you retarded or something?

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    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    Some projects I worked on last summer. Took me mostly 2 weeks or so.

    Removed 25 year old carpet, dewallpapered the walls, sanded the floors, refinished them etc. The coloring looks off because the floors are still drying. Took 3 days to dry due to it being July and humidity being like a million.

    Spoiler: 



    Did the same with the stairs. Was a real bitch with the rug, but the trim work I did made them look fantastic in the end.



    Had some damage in my office. Had to clean up the mold and re-drywall the place. The biggest bitch was the previous owner cut a giant whole in the wall to the left of wear I'm standing so they could fit in a 35" old school tube TV. Had to patch the shit out of that.
    Spoiler: 


    The last two is our family room. If you look at the 2nd image, the bottom half of the wall was all wood paneling that had to be ripped out. Then if you look behind the couch you see a white panted area, that's the height of the wood panelling. That white area also had to be ripped down and drywalled (was shit wood too). Redid the crown molding underneath the ledge as well. Every inch of the walls had wallpaper on them. In every room. Fuck it was hell.


  24. #24
    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Nice floor, man! I love darker coloured floors.

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    Sassy Fat Black Woman Agonizing the Bait Master's Avatar
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    Floating vinyl floor install. Pretty easy minus the retarded floor currently down
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    Registered User ToeMissile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agonizing the Bait Master View Post
    Floating vinyl floor install. Pretty easy minus the retarded floor currently down
    Lookin' good. Also.... ahhhh, wood paneling and memories.

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    Sassy Fat Black Woman Agonizing the Bait Master's Avatar
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    Ya I actually like the look of it so I'm going to keep it. Bathrooms are going be uber tough to update and keep the southern old style interior

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    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Nice laminate. Excellent choice!

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    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Wood paneling is the number one wall choice of serial killers

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    Low Information Janitor chaos's Avatar
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    When I ripped down the wood paneling in my basement, it left the walls butchered because the psychopaths who owned before me both nailed AND glued the shit down. I tried skim coating it, but the websites that said it was best left to professionals were right. It does not look professional. The room is my kids' playroom so it is ok, the walls are bound to get some abuse anyway. But eventually it will have to be fixed. From a distance you can't see it, but up close you can see the glue marks, even through a couple of layers of joint compound and paint. The joint compound was making the paper bubble on the wall, it was a mess. Once it dried it looked acceptable, for now anyway.

    TL;DR, fuck the people who owned my house before me.

    fuckinwall.jpg

  31. #31
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Double up on drywall bro

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    Low Information Janitor chaos's Avatar
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    When it comes down to it I'll probably just rip down the drywall and redo it. I have a sneaking suspicion that there is no insulation in the basement walls, or very little, and I want to expand the bathroom down there and put in a shower.

  33. #33
    Retired RR Pantheon Mod Convo's Avatar
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    So I bought a foreclosure years back.. I pretty much had to redo the entire upstairs and I still haven't stepped foot in the unfinished basement. The demolition of my bathroom may of been the worst thing I've ever done. For any of you who have dealt with Plaster, cement and chicken wire all together plus a tile floor and bathtub from the 50's. I actually had to rent a chipping tool to get the cement off the cinder blocks so the toilet would fit properly after we replaced the wall. Lucky for me I have some friends who helped me out. It took me months of 10 hour days after work to get the house in a livable condition. The rest of the house was covered in really bad wallpaper(skim coated over) and the kitchen appeared to be a project they started but didn't finish. They had new bottom cabinets in but no top cabinets, appliances, the walls were a mess, old window, etc.. It took me some time just to find what brand made the cabinets so I could match up the tops. I considered just replacing it all but they were brand new and I wanted to save some money since everything else pretty much was unusable. I wish I had my original photos of the before look but I can't seem to find them:-( Here are some updated shots tho.












  34. #34
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    I've considered those ceramic Wood planks. How do you like them? I fully feel your pain on the 50s cement walls. I probably took 2000 pounds of wall shit out of a 5x5 bathroom

  35. #35
    Retired RR Pantheon Mod Convo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picasso View Post
    I've considered those ceramic Wood planks. How do you like them? I fully feel your pain on the 50s cement walls. I probably took 2000 pounds of wall shit out of a 5x5 bathroom
    I love them and I get a ton of compliments on them. They are pricey tho. At least when I did it they were. If you do it just know you need a special blade for your wet saw that cuts porcelain tile. They also sell a chocolate grout that I used instead of a typical white. I wanted people to think they were real hardwoods. some people do heh.

    My basement has a ceiling with plaster and chicken wire. I started ripping it down but holy shit I can't get up the motivation to see it through. I'm at the hard parts where it meets the wall. I need to find a good cutting tool as I plan to build out off the original wall anyway and put up a new wall.
    Last edited by Convo; 01-25-2013 at 02:45 PM.

  36. #36
    Registered User ToeMissile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Convo View Post
    ... Here are some updated shots tho.
    Love the wood in the living room, I'm assuming it's original?

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    Retired RR Pantheon Mod Convo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToeMissile View Post
    Love the wood in the living room, I'm assuming it's original?
    yep. whole upstairs has it. I had someone come in and refinish it since it was left in poor condition. That wasnt a job I wanted to tackle on my own lol

  38. #38
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    I think with my corner chicken wire i'd just hook on with a crow bar hook and it usually pulled it out for a while.

  39. #39
    Retired RR Pantheon Mod Convo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picasso View Post
    I think with my corner chicken wire i'd just hook on with a crow bar hook and it usually pulled it out for a while.
    Been trying that. the chicken wire just breaks apart on me. Really beating my ass lol.

  40. #40
    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Convo View Post
    I love them and I get a ton of compliments on them. They are pricey tho. At least when I did it they were. If you do it just know you need a special blade for your wet saw that cuts porcelain tile. They also sell a chocolate grout that I used instead of a typical white. I wanted people to think they were real hardwoods. some people do heh.

    My basement has a ceiling with plaster and chicken wire. I started ripping it down but holy shit I can't get up the motivation to see it through. I'm at the hard parts where it meets the wall. I need to find a good cutting tool as I plan to build out off the original wall anyway and put up a new wall.
    Try banging the whole ceiling with a large hammer. Get the plaster busted up into bits, and then pulling the chicken wire should do the trick.

  41. #41
    Retired RR Pantheon Mod Convo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lurkingdirk View Post
    Try banging the whole ceiling with a large hammer. Get the plaster busted up into bits, and then pulling the chicken wire should do the trick.
    I actually started already. The chicken wire is only around the perimeter of the room. It goes about an inch down into the wall:-( here is where I'm at so far.






  42. #42
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Sick.

    Masonry abrasive blade on circular saw and go around the top of the wall?

  43. #43
    Retired RR Pantheon Mod Convo's Avatar
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    That's what i'm thinking. Just cut around the top of the wall. Probably easiest route. The plan is to build out off the wall anyway so It doesn't matter how much I cut out.

  44. #44
    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    I'd like to meet the people who did that to your basement, and slap them. hard. often.

    You could probably cut through it all with an angle grinder with the right blade. Likely wouldn't take much time, either.

  45. #45
    Retired RR Pantheon Mod Convo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lurkingdirk View Post
    I'd like to meet the people who did that to your basement, and slap them. hard. often.

    You could probably cut through it all with an angle grinder with the right blade. Likely wouldn't take much time, either.
    hah they are dead and gone probably.. That's just how these build these house in the 50's. In my area anyway.. All the bathrooms were pink and gray.. lol wish I still had those pics.

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    Registered User joeboo's Avatar
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    Tuck/bend that crap back behind the walls and drywall over it. I'm all about half-assing home projects and covering shit up to avoid more work than necessary

  47. #47
    Registered User ToeMissile's Avatar
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    Get a 2x2 or some reasonable solid piece of wood that's a couple feet long, tack the chicken wire along the length of the 2x2. Then pry or pull from the wood. Should spread the force along the wire and prevent it from breaking up... could also be not so easy to pull it all down... seems like it could be worth a shot.

  48. #48
    Retired RR Pantheon Mod Convo's Avatar
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    not a bad idea.. I'll give that a shot. I think I have a staple gun laying around too.

  49. #49
    Delicious Noodles Noodleface's Avatar
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    Can I ask a retarded question?

    The toilet in our apartment is always running. I can get it to stop by jiggling the handle, and upon inspection I can see why it does it. I'm about to get extremely technical here as I am an engineer so bear with me.

    The chain thingy is slightly too long, causing it sometimes to get stuck underneath the rubber doo-hicky that plugs the water from going down into the poop hole. This rubber doo-hicky is made of the most flimsy garbage ass material I ever done seen. So my question is, can I go to the store and buy a new "thing" "assembly" "whatever" and just put it in the toilet like nobody's business? Do I need to know the exact model?

    Not contacting the landlord's because they literally suck dick for money and pleasure.

  50. #50
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Adjust the chain

  51. #51
    Megistered Jooserockey Eomer's Avatar
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    Common problem. While they're not 100% standardized, there's a good chance you can just pick up a new generic chain and stopper set at Home Depot and replace them. Your best bet would be to turn the water supply off to the toilet tank, remove them, and bring them with you to the store so they can give you something that matches.

    Alternatively, you could adjust the chain so it won't get caught under the stopper. The chain should be just a wee bit loose when the handle isn't pressed. Just play with it and flush it a few times to see what works best.

    I replaced all the internals of the toilets in my condo because they were shit, and I continually had the same problem as well as a couple others.

  52. #52
    Delicious Noodles Noodleface's Avatar
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    I'll try that, the handle has a shitload (no pun) of play in it so sometimes the rubber stopper gets stuck at weird angles not related to the chain being under it.

  53. #53
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    Buy a flush valve that doesn't use a chain. Should cost you between 15-30$

  54. #54
    Rav Scam-Free Zone
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    My penis shrivels a bit reading this thread. I have a lot of work to do in my new home, and no clue how to do just about all of it.

    BBQ at my place, all the food and beer you can scarf down! Oh, and um, bring your tools...

  55. #55
    Registered User ToeMissile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneofOne View Post
    My penis shrivels a bit reading this thread. I have a lot of work to do in my new home, and no clue how to do just about all of it.

    BBQ at my place, all the food and beer you can scarf down! Oh, and um, bring your tools...
    There are a ton of resources online, and books you can grab at your preference of book seller. Youtube's a pretty good place to get tutorials as well. Just start small, and build up your skills/comfort. Pretty sure I saw somewhere that Lowe's/Home Depot might even do classes.

    If you have a friend/relative who has some experience and is willing to help you out getting your feet wet at least, you might as well ask.

  56. #56
    Registered User stupidmonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneofOne View Post
    My penis shrivels a bit reading this thread. I have a lot of work to do in my new home, and no clue how to do just about all of it.

    BBQ at my place, all the food and beer you can scarf down! Oh, and um, bring your tools...
    Scotch and I'll be there. Single Malt please.

  57. #57
    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToeMissile View Post
    There are a ton of resources online, and books you can grab at your preference of book seller. Youtube's a pretty good place to get tutorials as well. Just start small, and build up your skills/comfort. Pretty sure I saw somewhere that Lowe's/Home Depot might even do classes.

    If you have a friend/relative who has some experience and is willing to help you out getting your feet wet at least, you might as well ask.
    The big thing is getting started. Most of home repair is no where near as difficult as those without experience. Start small, do a lot of reading, and jump in. Start small, and ToeMissle's comment is probably the best thing possible - figure out which of your friends is somewhat handy, and get them to give you a hand with the first project. It'll give you a bit of extra confidence, and you'll find you're more capable than you thought.

    Good luck.
    (I like my burgers cooked medium rare.)

  58. #58
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    Anyone have a recommendation for a brand/model for a compound miter saw? About to start doing crown molding and I want to buy and not rent.

  59. #59
    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Draegan View Post
    Anyone have a recommendation for a brand/model for a compound miter saw? About to start doing crown molding and I want to buy and not rent.
    I HIGHLY recommend going with Craftsman. And, if you can swing it, get the 12" blade, rather than the standard 10". Don't get the lowest end of Craftsman, but the one step up from that is really great. I prefer the precision of Craftsman over that of any other compound miter saw I've ever used.

    This is a dream saw, but, then again, this one is a huge "bang for the buck."

    Hope that's helpful.

  60. #60
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    That's a pretty awesome online price too. I was looking at some DeWalts.

  61. #61
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Baseboard cap

    I've got a 4" notched baseboard with this on it as cap. Obviously this isn't looking too good and i'm wondering if i can just find this cap somewhere or what a man does in this situation.

    I've never seen two piece notched baseboard before. I may take the decent ones off and strip them but i don't want to get totally fucked if one piece breaks and i can't replace it.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  62. #62
    Freelance Gynecologist Wolfen's Avatar
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    I'd like to have the grass in my yard completely replaced with new sod, but I'm too lazy to do it myself. It's got too many bare spots and weeds. May hire a dirty spic to do it for me.

  63. #63
    Rav Scam-Free Zone
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    Project for the evening - replace the flushing assembly inside one of the toilets . Easy peasy! Take it apart, clean everything while I'm at it, put it back together, turn water back on and... water is leaking out of the gasket between the base and the tank (and yes, it's a new gasket). Fail! Will redo this all in the morning, I'm hungry.

  64. #64
    Registered User joeboo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneofOne View Post
    My penis shrivels a bit reading this thread. I have a lot of work to do in my new home, and no clue how to do just about all of it.

    BBQ at my place, all the food and beer you can scarf down! Oh, and um, bring your tools...
    I'm in the same boat. I know jack and shit about anything related to home projects. I'll build you a computer in an hour, but ask me to install a ceiling fan and I'll want to shoot myself in the face. Everything I try to do around the house ends up taking 4x longer than I had planned and usually ends in buckets of sweat(often blood also) and endless cursing.

    Just to give an example of how things usually go down in our house. Last weekend was warm here, so me and the wife got out in the front yard to rake up our gumballs(sweet gum tree...scourge of the earth), get the yard raked up and into yard waste bags in about an hour. Go inside and close the garage door, and as I'm walking away into the house I hear this HORRIBLE crunching and grinding noise. Apparently the wife put her rake too close to the garage door and it fell over and the rake handle was in the garage door tracks, and the garage door got totally stuck and fucked up about halfway down.

    So now the garage door will only close about half way, I start trying to adjust it with the little screwholes you can turn to adjust how far up or down it goes, and in the middle of turning one of them the screw thingamajigger actually falls off inside of the garage door opener casing. So I end up having to completely disassemble the garage door casing to get to the inside...blahblahblahblah

    Ends up taking like 3 hours to fix the goddamn garage door.

    tl;dr a 1-hour yard project ends up being a 4-hour home repair and wasting my entire afternoon.

    goddamn houses

  65. #65
    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeboo View Post
    I'm in the same boat. I know jack and shit about anything related to home projects. I'll build you a computer in an hour, but ask me to install a ceiling fan and I'll want to shoot myself in the face. Everything I try to do around the house ends up taking 4x longer than I had planned and usually ends in buckets of sweat(often blood also) and endless cursing.

    Just to give an example of how things usually go down in our house. Last weekend was warm here, so me and the wife got out in the front yard to rake up our gumballs(sweet gum tree...scourge of the earth), get the yard raked up and into yard waste bags in about an hour. Go inside and close the garage door, and as I'm walking away into the house I hear this HORRIBLE crunching and grinding noise. Apparently the wife put her rake too close to the garage door and it fell over and the rake handle was in the garage door tracks, and the garage door got totally stuck and fucked up about halfway down.

    So now the garage door will only close about half way, I start trying to adjust it with the little screwholes you can turn to adjust how far up or down it goes, and in the middle of turning one of them the screw thingamajigger actually falls off inside of the garage door opener casing. So I end up having to completely disassemble the garage door casing to get to the inside...blahblahblahblah

    Ends up taking like 3 hours to fix the goddamn garage door.

    tl;dr a 1-hour yard project ends up being a 4-hour home repair and wasting my entire afternoon.

    goddamn houses
    Heh. You speak the truth. One time, and I'm not kidding, I started a project intending only to replace a toilet. About a half hour job. Turned out that the flange was cracked, and I had plans to redo the bathroom in a couple years anyway. I ended up gutting the bathroom and moving all the plumbing and electrical. Half hour job turned into a two week job.

  66. #66
    Registered User mkopec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picasso View Post
    Baseboard cap

    I've got a 4" notched baseboard with this on it as cap. Obviously this isn't looking too good and i'm wondering if i can just find this cap somewhere or what a man does in this situation.

    I've never seen two piece notched baseboard before. I may take the decent ones off and strip them but i don't want to get totally fucked if one piece breaks and i can't replace it.
    How much of this shit do you have? Is it a large room, smaller room? Because if that was me I would replace all that shit with some modern base board trim and call it a day. I cannot think that an average room would take more than $100-150 to replace the moldings in, especially if its going to be painted. If stained, then add a $100 more.

    If you do want to replace it, you will pay an arm and a leg, but its possible. they do have places that can take your trim profile and make the tools to do so and its expensive.

    Further looking at the profile it looks like you can just make the shit if you have a table saw or rent one. It might not be exact thicknesses, or profile but you can match it closely so no one will notice if you replace it all. See below...

    BASE_MOLD.jpg
    Last edited by mkopec; 02-01-2013 at 09:01 PM.

  67. #67
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    Yeah new molding. Buy yourself an air compressor and a brad nailer. Shit is aaawesome.

  68. #68
    Registered User mkopec's Avatar
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    Yeah, the only reason I could see going through all that trouble to match up existing base molding or any trim is if you wanted to keep the historical theme of it or match all the other rooms, basically a restoration. But fuck all that.

  69. #69
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lurkingdirk View Post
    I HIGHLY recommend going with Craftsman. And, if you can swing it, get the 12" blade, rather than the standard 10". Don't get the lowest end of Craftsman, but the one step up from that is really great. I prefer the precision of Craftsman over that of any other compound miter saw I've ever used.

    This is a dream saw, but, then again, this one is a huge "bang for the buck."

    Hope that's helpful.
    I just bought the 12" miter saw linked above (the "dream" one). Somehow Sears sold it to me for $250. I haven't used it yet though. Maybe next weekend.

  70. #70
    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Draegan View Post
    I just bought the 12" miter saw linked above (the "dream" one). Somehow Sears sold it to me for $250. I haven't used it yet though. Maybe next weekend.
    I'm jelly. That's a nice saw. You should cut something, just because you can.

  71. #71
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    I'm redoing my fireplace by tiling the concrete hearth and building out to get wires in and new drywall due to some water damage and shit along the top.

    Anyway i wanted to put a 50 or 55" tv on the face where the 2x4s are and would like to have a mount so i could turn that corner and see it from the kitchen table (poker). The entire face is about 50" wide and i can put wood in there anywhere i need to to make the mount work but i'm having a hard time finding something like that that'd work with a 50"+ tv.

    I dont want to put it on the other face due to it being more awkward from where it will primarily be and when you enter the house you'll be seeing the side (hanger, cords etc)

    Regarding the baseboard i'm pretty sure you guys have released me from my siren spell. I'm definitely going to replace it in my entire living/diving room that way i can undo the damn trim entirely around the old (different dimensions) baseboard vents as well. Around this fireplace i'm going to hope i can tile well enough to not need anything......................................
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  72. #72
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    Can you mount a tv naked to the wall above a fireplace? Or do you need to do something special to the wall to protect it from the heat?

  73. #73
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    I'm not too concerned because I never use the fireplace but I will look into it. I may put in gas logs in the future.

  74. #74
    Low Information Janitor chaos's Avatar
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    A friend of mine had his mounted above the fireplace and he said it wasn't a problem. A cursory internet search indicates that the main issues you will face are heat, which may be mitigated by a mantle, and installation issues. If you damage the flue during installation you will be in a world of shit. The studs above fireplaces often do not follow standard spacing so that may be an issue.

    I would take heat measurements of the wall first just to be sure.

  75. #75
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    I'd also suggest looking into some decent wire channels to put in the wall while it's open. Could save a lot of hassle in the future. Also, stick extra HDMI cables back there for future use. You never know when you might want to toss in additional shit.

  76. #76
    Registered User mkopec's Avatar
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    I never understood why people want their TVs way up high like that on top of the fireplace to begin with. When youre sitting in your favorite lounge chair, you dont want to be looking up, but straight ahead so the TV is in line with your eyes.

  77. #77
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    I anticipate having a tv for hard watching in the basement. It's going over the fireplace in my instance because there's really no where else to put it. It's going to be a huge pain in the ass so I'm not thrilled.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picasso View Post
    a tv for hard watching
    What does this even mean?

  79. #79
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    when you're really going to put your time in and do some shit right like watch an entire trilogy or season of buckwild.

  80. #80
    Chip off the old block! aychamo_aycono's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeintokyo View Post
    What does this even mean?
    It's when he's really staring down those boners!

  81. #81
    Blood Bowl League Abandoner
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeintokyo View Post
    What does this even mean?
    It's related to clean nuts.

  82. #82
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    I am going to have my room repainted next week. I got ideas from reading magazines and the color combinations were really nice. I hope it turns out well. It will be always less expensive if I can do it by myself to get away from labor fees. A payday loan has always been helpful to me especially when I badly need urgent cash to pay for service fees that were really beyond my estimates. Get more info at: Get help for House Repair Costs
    Last edited by Grimmlokk; 02-16-2013 at 05:30 PM. Reason: Removed links, only didn't ban because Tucbro seems to have a reason not to

  83. #83
    Janitor Tuco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephensilva View Post
    I am going to have my room repainted next week. I got ideas from reading magazines and the color combinations were really nice. I hope it turns out well. It will be always less expensive if I can do it by myself to get away from labor fees. A ayday loan has always been helpful to me especially when I badly need urgent cash to pay for service fees that were really beyond my estimates. Get more info at: Get help for House Repair Costs
    only assholes get payday loans for home repairs.
    Last edited by Grimmlokk; 02-16-2013 at 05:31 PM.

  84. #84
    Don't Infract Me Bro Burnesto's Avatar
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    Or bots.

  85. #85
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Oh, tuco.

    Converted a switch to a 3 way for the stairs, god damn i like to consider myself a genius but i don't think i would have ever made it through that without an internet wiring diagram. They used double gang handy boxes in the walls for switches, probably to give themselves room to branch 2 extra lines off from every switch. I dont know why they couldn't just be normal.
    Last edited by Picasso; 02-16-2013 at 04:59 PM.

  86. #86
    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picasso View Post
    Oh, tuco.

    Converted a switch to a 3 way for the stairs, god damn i like to consider myself a genius but i don't think i would have ever made it through that without an internet wiring diagram. They used double gang handy boxes in the walls for switches, probably to give themselves room to branch 2 extra lines off from every switch. I dont know why they couldn't just be normal.
    3 way switches are magic. I have the intellectual knowledge of how they work. I have wired them. I can make them work. Really, they decide on their own if they work, though.

    You made a switch into a 3 way switch? You're a genius. (That's the point of this post.)

  87. #87
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    Did a lot of work this weekend. Used my new Craftsman miter saw and did crown molding in the new nursery. Did the paint a few weeks ago, and the trim on Friday. Finally finished late last night.

    I love new tools and for anyone doing Crown Molding or trim remember this: Caulk is your friend. Use it liberally.

    Edit: Picture below is with the crown molding without it's 2nd coat of paint. It got really beat up when it was being hung.

    crownmolding.jpg
    Last edited by Draegan; 02-19-2013 at 04:39 PM.

  88. #88
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    Is it a boy or a girl?

  89. #89
    Mister Manager Eyashusa's Avatar
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    We are redoing one of our bathrooms and I forgot to take pre-demo pictures to share

  90. #90
    infraction teflon Merkins4Brazil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Draegan View Post
    I love new tools and for anyone doing Crown Molding or trim remember this: Caulk is your friend. Use it liberally.
    nice work.

    Pro-tip, use low shrink spackle (not the vinyl garbage) on the joints and for spotting the nails. it applies tighter, dries quicker, is sand-able and holds up better over time.
    Last edited by Merkins4Brazil; 02-20-2013 at 10:26 AM.

  91. #91
    I build stuff. Olebass's Avatar
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    Caulk is not your best friend. If you have trusses after a few winters/summers it will either expand and suck it up leaving a gap or compress and smush it out leaving folds at the ceiling and wall.
    Room does look nice though!
    ( 26 years building/remodeling ).

  92. #92
    Registered User mkopec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olebass View Post
    Caulk is not your best friend. If you have trusses after a few winters/summers it will either expand and suck it up leaving a gap or compress and smush it out leaving folds at the ceiling and wall.
    Room does look nice though!
    ( 26 years building/remodeling ).
    Thats funny, because this is what I did to my molding in my house and it still looks great after many years. It looks a lot better than having a gaping hole between the molding and the wall like it did when we moved in. (Whomever did it did a shitty job) You just have to get the right stuff, not all caulk is the same. I use the latex interior 30 yr that can be painted on all the stuff inside.

  93. #93
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    Hmm all the calk has done ok during the hot summer and cold winter here so far. Couple spots it shrank in, but it's easy to fix.

  94. #94
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    I just got done putting up crown molding on my lower bedroom. Fuck. Can't do the top because the pieces are like 10ft long, gotta wait for the wife to give me some assistance.

  95. #95
    Are you an AssHat? lurkingdirk's Avatar
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    I'm going to be doing Crown Molding soon, and it is going to suck donkey balls. I'm going with stained oak, so no caulk to fix the oops. Oh, and it's a half-cathedral ceilings, so the corners meet at something like 123 degrees, rather than 90. There will be a lot of practice cuts.

    On the other hand, how do people feel about the corner blocks? This sort of thing:

    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=100054211&storeId=10051&l angId=-1&catalogId=10053&ci_sku=100054211&ci_kw={keyword} &kwd={keyword}&cm_mmc=shopping-_-googleads-_-pla-_-100054211&ci_gpa=pla#.USka71ccXYA

    It would certainly make my life easier. I do like the look of them, too, and they would suit the room. Thots?

  96. #96
    Notorious ruse master Picasso's Avatar
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    I like the clean line of straight trim but I think blocks look good sometimes particularly on inside corners when the trim isn't a huge contrast

  97. #97
    Sassy Fat Black Woman Agonizing the Bait Master's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lurkingdirk View Post
    I'm going to be doing Crown Molding soon, and it is going to suck donkey balls. I'm going with stained oak, so no caulk to fix the oops. Oh, and it's a half-cathedral ceilings, so the corners meet at something like 123 degrees, rather than 90. There will be a lot of practice cuts.

    On the other hand, how do people feel about the corner blocks? This sort of thing:

    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=100054211&storeId=10051&l angId=-1&catalogId=10053&ci_sku=100054211&ci_kw={keyword} &kwd={keyword}&cm_mmc=shopping-_-googleads-_-pla-_-100054211&ci_gpa=pla#.USka71ccXYA

    It would certainly make my life easier. I do like the look of them, too, and they would suit the room. Thots?
    For stained/ natural wood , they look great imo,
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  98. #98
    Administrator Draegan's Avatar
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    I just finished up crown molding this weekend in the bedrooms. Not too horrible. My house is old so the corner never meet up properly. I also trimmed out an entryway in the bedroom and it looks awesome. I'll snag a picture later.

    I am going to be putting in crown molding in my living room/dining room that has 8'ft ceilings that transition into 10' ceilings on a slight curve. I'm going to be doing layer molding so I'll be running tracks of trim and then put molding on top of those tracks and I have no idea how i'm going to get the curve stuff.

  99. #99
    Delicious Noodles Noodleface's Avatar
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    BTW, fixed my toilet without buying a rubber pump shit thing or messing with the hangy chain. Turns out the handle wasn't screwed in to the porcelain and just fell off one day. I screwed it in and it works great now. Even after eating 2 pounds of taco meat, the toilet still flushed down my shit. If that isn't a victory, I don't know what is.

    Carry on.

  100. #100
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    in regards to the guy with the french drain. that flooded when you got 9" of rain (well beyond 100year storm)

    easiest solution would be to take a roof leader or two and divert them to a subsurface leaching chamber to ensure that it does not happen again.

    i am going to assume you do own the house/own the land - ie not a condo/rental.

    layman version of figuring out where to put.- unless you have a walkout basement.
    walk around the house, your first floor sill should be level -measure down to ground from sill the lowest point is the largest distance to ground.

    sewer or septic system? if septic, make sure you are not working @ the septic system location.

    what is your ground like? gravel? sand? dirt? ledge? ie easy to dig into or not. lets Assume(ya i know what assuming does) it is not ledge and is not clay (ie pretty permeable) and the ground is ok for perculation rates.

    pick a spot that is ~10ish feet from the house near the lowest point and a decent distance from the property line- ie front yard or back yard, sides are ok if you have ~20+feet to the property line- also direct distance from 1 or 2 downspouts.

    buy two of these(or similar) with 2 ends and hook them both together per instructions:

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/1002106...specifications

    make a 4" hole in the end- there should be pipe holes in the end ..top of the end is where it should be bottom of inlet should be ~5" from the top of the chamber/end.

    this item will store (1.33x6.33x2.83) about 23 and a half cubic feet of water or about 175.5 gallons of water (7.48 gallons per cubic foot) each.

    buy enough 4" pvc drain pipe to go from your downspouts(one or two of them) to where you are going to dig.
    buy enough filter fabric to fill the bottom & sides of the hole you are about to dig.
    buy~150 cubic feet of 2" gravel to surround the chambers + enough to line the drain line trench bottom

    make your trench you are digging 5'wide ~3.5foot deep and 17' long to enable you to use 2 of them for groundwater recharge also make a 12" wide trench ~2' deep from the downspout location to the end of the hole. put filter fabric into recharge area bottom and sides. put 6" of stone on bottom of trench- make it level-
    place both chambers into the hole according to the instructions,. centered so that there is 1' on all sides of space

    fill hole with gravel- barely compacted- you want the space(voids) between the stones until you are where the invert of the pipe should be (~5" from the top of the chamber) place your pipe into the invert and run it to your downspout at a minimum 0.01 slope(pipe should go from the chamber invert up 1" per 10' section

    fill main trench with stone until the chamber is covered with ~6" of gravel- you SHOULD be about 12" from the top of the hole now. fold filter fabric over gravel. fill hole with dirt
    fill drain line trench with dirt.

    @house connect downspout to drain. tada done.

    now this is a SMALL system i have no idea how large your house is, but this system should be able to store and drain into the ground 465 gallons of water when full. if your perculation rate(rate at which the water absorbs/drains into the ground) is say 10 minutes an inch then every 10 minutes about 25 gallons of water is leaving the system.

    using city of boston regulations of 1" of runoff stored and recharged, it is good for a 746 sq.ft. of roof.(31'x24') since you have a french drain and other possible factors draining your roof, this is a good system size for supplemental roof runoff storage and infiltration requirements and taking some of the roof runoff away from your foundation.
    Last edited by Lenardo; 02-25-2013 at 06:41 PM.

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